Saturday, May 26, 2007

Sinister jigsaw puzzles

A fascinating article on the people and computers working to piece together shredded Stasi files. (Thanks to Ed Park for the link.)

9 comments:

  1. This isn't about the article itself -- which, like you, I found fascinating -- but I just wanted to leave a little note saying how much I appreciate the material you link to. You're like what AL Daily was before it hit (and decided to stick to) that one shrill, almost anti-intellectual note.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Not really a commnet on the above (or is it below?) but just a note to say I found the 2005 posting re Never Let Me Go very interesting. I have justg finished this book and find that his adapted style for this book was insidiously perfect. Naivete, yearning, hopefulness without grounds, myth-believing. Hail Sham.
    Those boxes of things of no value, the attachment to what can not be had, children, the belief in a kind of reprieve (semi-salvation?) and the goodness of the sub-contractor (the folks who ran the creme-de-la-spoiing-creme Hailsham, all really speak to us and who we are and how little it means in the end. Which does not speak of pessimism but only the Becketian "I can't go on, I'll go on."
    This book is one hell of an achievement. And though delayed a year, I look forward to your fifteen and upper with all its promised quirkiness. I probably will skip the academic work, though. Love and kisses, McD

    ReplyDelete
  3. The Stasi article is very Riddle of the Traveling Skull (the ripped-up poem)...!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks, guys! For some reason blogger has recently (mostly) stopped e-mailing me comments, so it is a nice treat to find all this good stuff here. Richard, you remind me that I must reread "Never Let Me Go," I sort of feel like it's got to be on my top-ten favorite novels of all time but perhaps had better check that out with a reread before adding it to the list...

    ReplyDelete
  5. Never Let Me Go is also a personal favourite, though the episode when Kathy and Tommy visit Miss Emily has always struck me as the one 'sore thumb' of the novel - clunky, for some reason. I've tried to decide why but can't seem to hit on the reason. What do you think?

    The final scene is beautiful, however, and the last lines, using as they do the only extended metaphor of the whole novel (as far as I can remember!), remind me of your own admonitions to spareness in this regard. Once is obviously enough...

    ReplyDelete
  6. I agree about the visit to Miss Emily's. I thought that maybe her monologue was a little too long, like Ishiguro used the scene to package everything up a little too neatly. The book is amazing though. I read it while I was resting between my first and second donations. It's one of the things that got me though-- I've just been called for my fourth!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I agree that this Stasi article is fascinating. Having recently seen The Lives of Others, I posted about it too (finding out about the project via Nature rather than the BBC), at:
    http://petrona.typepad.com/petrona/2007/05/digital_jigsaw_.html
    In the comments to that post are a couple of recommendations of books that look rather tempting.
    A haunting tale. Let me know if you would like the entire Nature article.
    Maybe some box has become unchecked in your blogger dashboard for some strange reason(the email alerts)?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Next week Abby will be going a class trip to Berlin, during which one day of the programme is devoted to the NS/Stasi past (and one to democracy), as I've already mentioned on another blog, and includes visits to the former Stasi prison and to the Stasi museum. I'm going to interview Abby or ask her to write a guest post over at Lowebrow about her experiences, since this topic is attracting so much attention. In Germany, of course, the 'puzzle pieces' have been in all the media.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I don't remember the priest telling me when I went to Confession when I was a kid, "Well, Lance, it was wrong of you to disobey your mom and talk back to her like that, but since you set the table every night and do your homework and sent your aunt a birthday card, what the heck! You're a good kid. Your sins are forgiven automatically. No need for you to do any penance." 文秘 心脑血管 糖尿病 高血压 糖尿病 高血脂 高脂血症 冠心病 心律失常 心肌病 心肌炎 中风 偏瘫 脑出血心律失常 什么是心力衰竭 神经衰弱 心肌梗死 心脏瓣膜病 先天性心脏病 动脉硬化 风湿性心脏病 脑瘫 癫痫 羊角风 老年性痴呆 低血压 急性感染性心内膜炎 雷诺综合症 脑血栓 血栓闭塞性脉管炎 周围血管异常 肺心病 什么是心绞痛 脑梗塞 And maybe it's happened a few times and I haven't heard about it but I can't recall a judge ever letting somebody walk on the grounds the crook was a good guy and his friends really like him.

    ReplyDelete